International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society

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Webinars

The ISRS began a serie of Webinars, starting October 11th, 2016.

These Webinars are organized through a specific online service. If you wish to attend these sessions, you will be asked to register first, but you also need to have a device (computer, smartphone, tablet) that meets specific requirements. Click here to check your system

After the webinar, a video replay is made available to ISRS members.

Next Webinars

October 31, 2017

Radiosurgery for the management of vestibular schwannomas by Marc LEVIVIER

1:00 pm (Dublin, Edinburgh, Lisbon, London) - 2:00 pm CET (Amsterdam, Berlin, Bern, Paris, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna) - 9:00 am (Eastern time - New York, Canada) - 11:00 am (Brasilia) - 10:00 pm (Tokyo) - 6:00 am (Pacific time - Los Angeles) - 11:00pm (Brisbane)

In this webinar, I will cover the topic of the use of radiosurgery for the management of vestibular schwannomas (VS). In this context, I will review the safety and efficacy of upfront radiosurgery for small- to medium-size VS. In addition, I will address the role of radiosurgery for very small (intracanalicular) VS, especially in the context of early treatment versus observation. Finally, I will also discuss the role of radiosurgery for large VS, focusing on the functional outcome of combining the approaches of microsurgery and radiosurgery.


November 09, 2017

Differentiation of Radiation-induced Changes and Tumor Progression after Intracranial Radiosurgery by Mikhail CHERNOV

1:00 pm (Dublin, Edinburgh, Lisbon, London) - 2:00 pm CET (Amsterdam, Berlin, Bern, Paris, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna) - 8:00 am (Eastern time - New York, Canada) - 11:00 am (Brasilia) - 10:00 pm (Tokyo) - 5:00 am (Pacific time - Los Angeles) - 11:00pm (Brisbane)

A number of intracranial tumors demonstrate some degree of enlargement after stereotactic radiosurgery. It necessitates differentiation of their regrowth and various treatment-related effects. The diagnosis is frequently complicated by histopathological heterogeneity of the lesion with coexistent viable neoplasm and radiation-induced tissue changes. Several neuroimaging modalities, namely structural MRI, DWI, DTI, perfusion CT and MRI, single-voxel and multi-voxel proton MRS, as well as SPECT and PET with various radioisotope tracers, may provide valuable diagnostic information. Each of these methods has advantages and limitations that may influence their usefulness and diagnostic accuracy.

November 24, 2017

SBRT for Borderline Resectable/Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer by Marta SCORSETTI

1:00 pm (Dublin, Edinburgh, Lisbon, London) - 2:00 pm CET (Amsterdam, Berlin, Bern, Paris, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna) - 8:00 am (Eastern time - New York, Canada) - 11:00 am (Brasilia) - 10:00 pm (Tokyo) - 5:00 am (Pacific time - Los Angeles) - 11:00pm (Brisbane)

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is characterized by a poor prognosis, with a 5-year overall survival rate of about 6%. Surgery is the gold standard of care with 5-year OS rates of 20% to 25%. More than 50% of patients, however, are borderline resectable or unresectable at the time of diagnosis, mainly due to locally advanced disease or distant metastases. In patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the integration of chemotherapy and chemo-radiation treatment is the current therapeutic option. In the recent years, the role of SBRT in the treatment of borderline resectable and unresectable pancreatic cancer was investigated to confirm the hypothetical advantages of this therapy over conventional chemo-radiation.  In this webinar clinical data of SBRT efficacy and toxicity will be discussed.

December 21, 2017

SRS/SRT Convexity and Parasagittal Meningiomas by Sergey ANIKIN

1:00 pm (Dublin, Edinburgh, Lisbon, London) - 2:00 pm CET (Amsterdam, Berlin, Bern, Paris, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna) - 8:00 am (Eastern time - New York, Canada) - 11:00 am (Brasilia) - 10:00 pm (Tokyo) - 5:00 am (Pacific time - Los Angeles) - 11:00pm (Brisbane)

Complete tumor resection is not always possible. Many patient will not choose surgery treatment in case small- and medium sized tumors. Gamma-knife radiosurgery is effective method of treatment for convexity and parasagittal meningiomas as the adjuvant and initial treatment.The results treatment of meningiomas following stereotactic radiosurgery have been reported numerous publications. We focus on convexity and parasagittal meningiomas, treated with stereotactic radiosurgery, as most neurosutgeon prefer resection of radiosurgery to treat this type of tumor.

February 08, 2018

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Radiosurgery of AVM (But Were Afraid to Ask) by Mikhail CHERNOV

1:00 pm (Dublin, Edinburgh, Lisbon, London) - 2:00 pm CET (Amsterdam, Berlin, Bern, Paris, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna) - 8:00 am (Eastern time - New York, Canada) - 10:00 am (Brasilia) - 10:00 pm (Tokyo) - 5:00 am (Pacific time - Los Angeles) - 11:00pm (Brisbane)

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an effective management option of intracranial AVM. It is particularly indicated for deep-seated or critically-located lesions. Successful treatment results in obliteration of the nidus within 1-3 years (so-called “latency period”) due to gradual thickening of the vessel wall. In small AVM (® is used. In general, it seems that for Spetzler-Martin grades I-II AVM microsurgical resection is the treatment of choice, for grade III single-staged SRS may be considered, whereas for grade IV-V either staged SRS or combined treatment is reasonable. However, this scheme is very general, and determination of the optimal treatment strategy for such patients depends on the various additional parameters.